Writing – What to do when you’re sick to death of your manuscript

One of the many things that writers have in common is that when they have been working on a manuscript for a while, they get to the stage that just looking at it sends them checking their emails, reading the daily horoscope or making yet another cup of coffee. Sounds familiar? If it doesn’t, this is not for you and what is more, I don’t like you either. (Only joking.)

Girl with typewriter

I really don’t think anything can truly relieve the weary author of manuscriptitis and what is more doctors are truly useless if you approach them with it – I know, I have tried. However, I have three tips that might take a little of the pain away.

Visiting doctor

Put a miserly timer on how long you will work on it. This truly does help. If you think that you will spend all Saturday afternoon editing away, you may find that a huge amount of that time is spent staring at it, looking on Amazon or sending very long emails to your friends. However, if you give yourself one hour a day and when your time is up, you are not allowed to do any more – you will work for an hour. It is amazing how much you can get done in one hour that does not have self-imposed interruptions.

An old clock

Work out exactly what you are going to do before your hour starts. If you are really sick of your manuscript, you can waste an hour wondering what your next step should be. Making a checklist at this stage is vital. So for instance, instead of reading your manuscript yet again and generally just looking over it, you will be looking for something specific. This means that you have one hour only to check that you have enough conflict in each scene or whatever you wish to grind away at. You won’t get through the whole manuscript in one hour but what you do get through will be purely focussed and you can continue with that task in your hourly allotment until you have completed it. Continue in this way working through your checklist.

old manuscript

Work from a printed up copy. There are two reasons why this works. One is that your mind sees it as a change from peering at the computer screen and so welcomes it. It also flings mistakes at you that, for some reason, do not seem so apparent on the screen. This are not just clumsy typos either, you will probably be able to see where you have been telling instead of showing and also how you can elaborate on the senses of your character.

Hope this helps. Happy writing.

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8 Comments

Filed under Creative Writing, Inspiration and Us

8 responses to “Writing – What to do when you’re sick to death of your manuscript

  1. Whenever this happens to me I always try to look at my manuscript from a different perspective. I’ll change the font, the color, look at a hard copy, etc. It’s kind of tricks your brain into thinking you’re working on something new.

  2. Thank you – I really needed those reminders this morning! I’ve also found that a ‘piece work’ approach can help too; promising yourself that you only have to do a certain bit and once that’s achieved you will stop. It appears much more achievable that way, than hours and hours in front of you! Lovely post. Very welcome! x

  3. Thanks for posting this – I wish I had read it a couple of hours ago, when I was working on my manuscript. When I could stand looking at it no more, I went and did the housework 🙂

  4. Neridah ROGERS

    Sound advice.

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